Lonely Adults, Lonely Kids

Brad M. Griffin | Jan 5, 2011

Recent research from Iowa State indicates that Many adults are chronically lonely.

According to one study, 35% of those 45 and older may be chronically lonely. This AARP article further points out that its not necessarily the oldest among us, but those in their 40s and 50s who experience the most chronic loneliness (or who report itone theory is that Baby Boomers are more likely to share about loneliness than folks from the Depression era).

What strikes me from this finding is that most parents of students in our ministries are in their 40s and 50s. So while their kids are experiencing what many describe as the loneliest experience of lifeadolescenceparents may in fact be walking a strikingly similar path.

How can we reach out to adults and kids in ways that build more life-giving social connections? How can we tap into this reality in ways that create increased contact between adults and kids? Maybe even fostering parent-child relationships that stump the experience of loneliness in both life phases?

Brad M. Griffin

Brad M. Griffin is the Senior Director of Content for the Fuller Youth Institute (FYI), where he develops research-based training for youth workers and parents. A speaker, blogger, and volunteer youth pastor, Brad is the coauthor of Faith in an Anxious World, Growing Young, several Sticky Faith books, Every Parent’s Guide to Navigating Our Digital World, and the series Can I Ask That?: 8 Hard Questions about God and Faith. Brad and his family live in Southern California.


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